Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/20064
Authors: 
Beine, Michel
Docquier, Frédéric
Rapoport, Hillel
Year of Publication: 
2003
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion paper series 819
Abstract: 
We present an empirical evaluation of the growth effects of the brain drain for the source countries of migrants. Using recent US data on migration rates by education levels (Carrington and Detragiache, 1998), we find empirical support for the ?beneficial brain drain hypothesis? in a cross-section of 50 developing countries. At the country-level, we find that most countries combining low levels of human capital and low migration rates of skilled workers tend to be positively affected by the brain drain. By contrast, the brain drain appears to have negative growth effects in countries where the migration rate of the highly educated is above 20% and/or where the proportion of people with higher education is above 5%. While the number of winners is smaller, these include nearly 80% of the total population of the sample.
Subjects: 
brain drain
migration
growth
human capital formation
immigration policy
JEL: 
J24
F22
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
631.03 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.