Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/200574
Authors: 
Aaronson, Daniel
Davis, Jonathan
Schulze, Karl
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper 2018-04
Abstract: 
Between 1907 and 1914, the "Galveston Movement," a philanthropic effort spearheaded by Jacob Schiff, fostered the immigration of approximately 10,000 Russian Jews through the Port of Galveston, Texas. Upon arrival, households were given train tickets to pre-selected locations west of the Mississippi River where a job awaited. Despite the program's stated purpose to locate new Russian Jewish immigrants to the Western part of the U.S., we find that almost 90 percent of the prime age male participants ultimately moved east of the Mississippi, typically to large Northeastern and Midwestern cities. We use a standard framework for modeling location decisions to show destination assignments made cities more desirable, but this effect was overwhelmed by the attraction of religious and country of origin enclaves. By contrast, there is no economically or statistically significant effect of a place having a larger base of immigrants from other areas of the world and economic conditions appear to be of secondary importance, especially for participants near the bottom of the skill distribution. Our paper also introduces two novel adjustments for matching historical data - using an objective measure of match quality to fine tune our match scores and a deferred acceptance algorithm to avoid multiple matching.
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
962.21 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.