Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/200445
Authors: 
Barr, Abigail
Lane, Tom
Nosenzo, Daniele
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
CeDEx Discussion Paper Series No. 2017-11
Publisher: 
The University of Nottingham, Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics (CeDEx), Nottingham
Abstract: 
We experimentally investigate the relationship between discriminatory behaviour and the perceived social inappropriateness of discrimination. We test the framework of Akerlof and Kranton (2000, 2005), which suggests discrimination will be stronger when social norms favour it. Our results support this prediction. Using a Krupka-Weber social norm elicitation task, we find participants perceive it to be less socially inappropriate to discriminate on the basis of social identities artificially induced, using a trivial minimal group technique, than on the basis of nationality. Correspondingly, we find that participants discriminate more in the artificial identity setting. Our results suggest norms and the preference to comply with them affect discriminatory decisions and that the social inappropriateness of discrimination moderates discriminatory behaviour.
Subjects: 
discrimination
social norms
Krupka-Weber method
allocator game
JEL: 
C71
C92
D03
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.