Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/200119
Authors: 
Mueller-Langer, Frank
Fecher, Benedikt
Harhoff, Dietmar
Wagner, Gert G.
Year of Publication: 
2019
Citation: 
[Journal:] Research Policy [Volume:] 48 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 62-83 [ISSN:] 0048-7333
Abstract: 
We investigate how often replication studies are published in empirical economics and what types of journal articles are replicated. We find that between 1974 and 2014 0.1% of publications in the top 50 economics journals were replication studies. We consider the results of published formal replication studies (whether they are negating or reinforcing) and their extent: Narrow replication studies are typically devoted to mere replication of prior work, while scientific replication studies provide a broader analysis. We find evidence that higher-impact articles and articles by authors from leading institutions are more likely to be replicated, whereas the replication probability is lower for articles that appeared in top 5 economics journals. Our analysis also suggests that mandatory data disclosure policies may have a positive effect on the incidence of replication.
Subjects: 
Replication
Economics of science
Science policy
Economic methodology
JEL: 
A1
B4
C12
C13
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Published Version
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.