Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/19984
Authors: 
Baptista, Rui
Year of Publication: 
2004
Series/Report no.: 
Papers on entrepreneurship, growth and public policy 3904
Abstract: 
This paper examines the relationship between cultural values, political institutions and government regulation of entry. For this, it couples data for 53 countries from a variety of sources in comparative political economy and cross-cultural psychology. A society's general attitude towards risk and uncertainty and power inequality are embedded in its institutions; hence, such values should mediate the intensity with which economic incentives affect regulatory procedures and outcomes. Results suggest that entry regulation levels are correlated with the way people in different countries deal with risk and uncertainty and accept inequality of power in their dealings with government institutions. Moreover, these intrinsic cultural values act as moderators for the correlation between economic and political variables, and regulatory intensity. Regulation thus emerges a response from government institutions to societies' needs deriving from cultural values.
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
508.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.