Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/197926
Authors: 
Albouy, David
Chernoff, Alex
Lutz, Chandler
Warman, Casey
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Bank of Canada Staff Working Paper 2019-12
Abstract: 
We examine local labor markets in the United States and Canada from 1990 to 2011 using comparable household and business data. Wage levels and inequality rise with city population in both countries, albeit less in Canada. Neither country saw wage levels converge despite contrasting migration patterns from/to high-wage areas. Local labor demand shifts raise nominal wages similarly, although in Canada they attract immigrant and highly skilled workers more, while raising housing costs less. Chinese import competition had a weaker negative impact on manufacturing employment in Canada. These results are consistent with Canada's more redistributive transfer system and larger, moreeducated immigrant workforce.
Subjects: 
Labour markets
JEL: 
J21
J31
J61
R12
N32
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.