Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/197671
Authors: 
Sepahvand, Mohammad H.
Shahbazian, Roujman
Swain, Ranjula Bali
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper 2019:2
Abstract: 
A popular uprising in 2014, led to a revolution overthrowing the sitting president of Burkina Faso. We investigate if individuals' risk attitudes changed due to this revolution. Specifically, we investigate the impact of the revolution on risk attitudes, by gender, age and level of education. The analysis is based on a unique nationally representative panel Household Budget Survey, which allows us to track the changes in the risk attitudes of the same individuals before, during and after the revolution. Our results suggest that the impact of the revolution is short-term. Individuals become risk averse during the revolution but converge back to the pre-revolution risk attitudes, slightly increasing their risk taking, after the revolution is over. Women are more risk taking than the men after the revolution but are more risk averse during the revolution. In general, older individuals tend to have higher risk aversion than the younger individuals. During the revolution, however, the individuals with higher level of education are less willing to take risk.
Subjects: 
exogenous shock
revolution
gender
Burkina Faso
JEL: 
D12
D74
D81
O12
Z10
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.