Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/196145
Authors: 
Biermann, Philipp
Welsch, Heinz
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
Oldenburg Discussion Papers in Economics V-422-19
Abstract: 
We decompose the persistent satisfaction gap between East and West Germany into effects of objective circumstances and subjective mentality, the latter presumed to be a legacy of communist socialization. Using the methodology proposed by Senik (2014) in a cross-national context, we capture circumstances by the region of residence (East vs. West) and mentality by whether an individual is a "native" of the respective region or has moved ("migrated") to that region. We differentiate our analysis by years since German unification, birth cohorts, and the length of time a "migrant" has lived in her current region of residence. Using about 420,000 observations, 1990-2016, we find 54.4 percent of the satisfaction gap to be attributable to mentality. The mentality gap in the overall sample is driven by birth cohorts socialized under communism, the contribution of mentality to the satisfaction gap being 81.2 percent in this cohort group. While the circumstance-related gap diminished steadily over time, the mentality-related gap changed non-monotonically, reflecting different happiness responses of East and West Germans to politico-economic shocks. Exploiting the panel nature of our data, we find the mentality-related gap to show little indication of within-person changes over time.
Subjects: 
Germany
happiness
life satisfaction
unification
mentality
communism
JEL: 
I31
P36
P16
D63
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
462.12 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.