Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/195252
Authors: 
Brambilla, Irene
Galiani, Sebastian
Porto, Guido
Year of Publication: 
2018
Citation: 
[Journal:] Latin American Economic Review [ISSN:] 2196-436X [Volume:] 28 [Year:] 2018 [Issue:] 4 [Pages:] 1-30
Abstract: 
At the turn of the last century, the Argentine economy was on a path to prosperity that never fully developed. International trade and trade policies are often identified as a major culprit. In this paper, we review the history of Argentine trade policy to uncover its exceptional features and to explore its contribution to the Argentine debacle. Our analysis tells a story of bad trade policies, rooted in distributional conflict and shaped by changes in constraints, that favored industry over agriculture in a country with a fundamental comparative advantage in agriculture. While the anti-export bias impeded productivity growth in agriculture, the import substitution strategy was not successful in promoting an efficient industrialization. In the end, Argentine growth never took-off.
Subjects: 
Tariff protection
Export taxes on agriculture
Anti-export bias
JEL: 
F13
F14
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.