Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/195100
Authors: 
Proaño Acosta, Christian
Peña, Juan Carlos
Saalfeld, Thomas
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
BERG Working Paper Series 149
Abstract: 
This paper investigates the macroeconomic and social determinants of voting behavior, and especially of political polarization, for 20 advanced countries using annual data ranging from 1970 to 2016 and covering 291 parliamentary elections. Using a panel estimation approach and rolling regressions we find empirical evidence supporting that a) traditionally established mainstream parties (center-left, center, and center-right) are penalized for poor economic performance; b) far-left (populist and radical parties) parties benefit from increasing unemployment rates; c) greater income inequality has increased the electoral support for far-right parties, particularly in recent times. Further, we do not find empirical support for the notion that social and economic globalization has led to an increase of popularity of far-right parties. These results have wide reaching implications for the current political situation in the Western world.
Subjects: 
Income Inequality
Political Polarization
Globalization
Economic Voting Behavior
JEL: 
E12
E24
E32
E44
ISBN: 
978-3-943153-70-5
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.