Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/194024
Authors: 
Werner, Katharina
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper 128
Abstract: 
Economic research suggests that investments in early education are generally more successful than investments at later ages. This paper presents a representative survey experiment on education spending in Germany, which exhibits low relative public spending on early education. Results are consistent with a model of misconceptions: informing randomly selected respondents about benefits of early education spending shifts majority support for public spending increases from later education levels to spending on early and primary education. Effects of information provision persist over a two-week period in a follow-up survey. By contrast, results do not suggest self-interested groups inefficiently allocate public education spending.
Subjects: 
misconceptions
public spending
education spending
information
survey experiment
JEL: 
I22
D83
H52
P16
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.31 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.