Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/193640
Authors: 
Vernon, Victoria
Zimmermann, Klaus F.
Year of Publication: 
2019
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 330
Abstract: 
Throughout history, border walls and fences have been built for defense, to claim land, to signal power, and to control migration. The costs of fortifications are large while the benefits are questionable. The recent trend of building walls and fences signals a paradox: In spite of the anti-immigration rhetoric of policymakers, there is little evidence that walls are effective in reducing terrorism, migration, and smuggling. Economic research suggests large benefits to open border policies in the face of increasing global migration pressures. Less restrictive migration policies should be accompanied by institutional changes aimed at increasing growth, improving security and reducing income inequality in poorer countries.
Subjects: 
Walls
fences
defense
security
international migration
mobility
JEL: 
F22
F66
H56
J61
N4
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.