Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/191854
Authors: 
Thonipara, Anita
Runst, Petrik
Ochsner, Christian
Bizer, Kilian
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
ifh Working Paper 12/2018
Abstract: 
Despite a common EU directive on energy efficiency in residential buildings, levels of energy efficiency differ vastly across European countries. This article analyses these differences and investigates the effectiveness of different energy efficiency policies in place in those countries. We firstly use panel data to explain average yearly energy consumption per dwelling and country by observable characteristics such as climatic conditions, energy prices, income, and floor area. We then use the unexplained variation by sorting between-country differences as well as plotting within-country changes over time to identify better performing countries. These countries are analysed qualitatively in a second step. We conduct expert interviews and examine the legal rules regarding building energy efficiency. Based on our exploratory analysis we generate a number of hypotheses. First, we suggest that regulatory standards, in conjunction with increased construction activity, can be effective in the long run. Second, the results suggest that carbon taxation represents an effective means for energy efficiency.
Subjects: 
carbon-taxation
energy efficiency
energy conservation
climate policy
residential buildings
JEL: 
H23
K32
P18
Q58
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.