Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/189905
Authors: 
Crafts, Nicholas F. R.
Klein, Alexander
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
School of Economics Discussion Papers 1715
Abstract: 
We construct spatially-weighted indices of the geographic concentration of U.S. manufacturing industries during the period 1880 to 1997 using data from the Census of Manufactures and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Several important new results emerge from this exercise. First, we find that average spatial concentration was much lower in the late 20th - than in the late 19th - century and that this was the outcome of a continuing reduction over time. Second, the persistent tendency to greater spatial dispersion was characteristic of most manufacturing industries. Third, even so, economically and statistically significant spatial concentration was pervasive throughout this period.
Subjects: 
manufacturing belt
spatial concentration
transport costs
JEL: 
N62
N92
R12
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.55 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.