Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/189895
Authors: 
Székely, Barnabás
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
MNB Working Papers 2018/3
Abstract: 
The study evaluates bank efficiency in the EU member states of Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) using stochastic frontier analysis (SFA). Relying on a comprehensive dataset covering the post-crisis period from 2010 to 2016, country-specific average profit and cost efficiencies are calculated. Compared with similar pre-crisis studies, the results highlight the reshuffling effects of the financial crisis. Hungary, for instance, that was consistently found to have a comparatively efficient banking system, now performs well below average. Contrasting the results of traditional performance indicators with SFA supports the mechanism put forward by the Quiet Life Hypothesis. The positive relationship of market share and return on assets (or equity) indicates that higher market power enables banks to realize higher profits. SFA, on the other hand, suggests a negative association implying that banks do not tend to fully exploit this potential.
Subjects: 
Bank Efficiency
Stochastic Frontier Analysis
Central and Eastern Europe
JEL: 
G21
P52
C12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.