Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/189877
Authors: 
Fuster, Andreas
Plosser, Matthew
Schnabl, Philipp
Vickery, James
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Staff Report No. 836
Abstract: 
Technology-based ("FinTech") lenders increased their market share of U.S. mortgage lending from 2 percent to 8 percent from 2010 to 2016. Using market-wide, loan-level data on U.S. mortgage applications and originations, we show that FinTech lenders process mortgage applications about 20 percent faster than other lenders, even when controlling for detailed loan, borrower, and geographic observables. Faster processing does not come at the cost of higher defaults. FinTech lenders adjust supply more elastically than other lenders in response to exogenous mortgage demand shocks, thereby alleviating capacity constraints associated with traditional mortgage lending. In areas with more FinTech lending, borrowers refinance more, especially when it is in their interest to do so. We find no evidence that FinTech lenders target marginal borrowers. Our results suggest that technological innovation has improved the efficiency of financial intermediation in the U.S. mortgage market.
Subjects: 
mortgage
technology
prepayments
nonbanks
JEL: 
D14
D24
G21
G23
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.62 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.