Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/188941
Authors: 
Rieu, Alain-Marc
Year of Publication: 
2014
Citation: 
[Journal:] Triple Helix [ISSN:] 2197-1927 [Volume:] 1 [Year:] 2014 [Issue:] 1 [Pages:] 1-22
Abstract: 
Innovation policies are considered the long-term strategy to overcome the present systemic crisis. But this crisis is questioning such policies, their presuppositions and institutional arrangements. This questioning includes the Triple Helix theory and its impact on research and innovation policies. The goal is to examine how this theory can respond to theoretical and practical challenges, how the theory needs to evolve in order to fit the present context. The criticism focuses on growing worldwide standardization of research and innovation policies and their long-term impact on innovation. Restoring and increasing research diversity is urgent for sustained innovation. One solution is to add 'society' as a fourth helix. The problem is to clarify what 'society' stands for in this context. The paper studies three different institutional arrangements, France, Germany, and Japan, because these three cases can learn from each other and contribute to progress in the Helix theory itself. Potential reforms are summarized in some policy recommendations.
Subjects: 
Triple Helix
Diversity
Allemagne
Diversité
Fourth helix
France
Germany
Governance
Innovation territories
Institution
Institutions
Japan
Japon
Politique de recherche
Quatrième hélix
Research policy
Territoires d'innovation
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.