Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/187539
Authors: 
Farooqi, Saira
Abid, Ghulam
Ahmed, Alia
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] Arab Economic and Business Journal [ISSN:] 2214-4625 [Volume:] 12 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 69-80
Abstract: 
Whistleblowers are ostracized and isolated for identifying wrongdoings. Despite this deterrent, the whistleblowers have not recoiled. Nonetheless, organizations need to develop an ethical corporate culture, where employees become "ethical partners" and do the right thing, not because they have to, but because they want to. The study aimed to measure the effects of ethical cultural practices using the lens of Kaptein's (2008) Corporate Ethical Virtues Model (CEVM). Split Questionnaire Survey Design (SDSD) was chosen to record responses of 104 internal auditors working in nine public and sixteen private sector organizations. Results reveal significant positive relationships between whistleblowing and the CEVM virtues.
Subjects: 
Whistleblowing
Wrongdoing
Reporting
Corporate Ethical Virtues Model (CEVM)
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.