Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/18699
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHendricks, Lutzen_US
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-28T15:52:15Z-
dc.date.available2009-01-28T15:52:15Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/18699-
dc.description.abstractThe fraction of persons holding a college degree differs nearly two-fold across U.S. states.This paper documents data related to state educational attainment differences and explorespossible explanations. It shows that highly educated states employ skillbiased technologies,specialize in skill-intensive industries, but do not pay lower skill premia than do less educatedstates. Moreover, measures of urbanization and population density are positively related toeducational attainment. Theories based on agglomeration economies offer naturalexplanations for these observations.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aCenter for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute (CESifo) |cMunichen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aCESifo Working Paper |x1335en_US
dc.subject.jelR11en_US
dc.subject.jelJ24en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordeducationen_US
dc.subject.keywordagglomerationen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsniveauen_US
dc.subject.stwBildungsökonomiken_US
dc.subject.stwAgglomerationseffekten_US
dc.subject.stwVereinigte Staatenen_US
dc.titleWhy does educational attainment differ across US states?en_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn477393225en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.08 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.