Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/186010
Authors: 
Gross, Dominique M.
Year of Publication: 
2012
Citation: 
[Journal:] Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics [ISSN:] 2235-6282 [Volume:] 148 [Year:] 2012 [Issue:] 4 [Pages:] 497-530
Abstract: 
In 2002, Switzerland started to implement free mobility with the European Union and simultaneously immigration rules for citizens from the rest of the world became more stringent. Only skilled workers could be hired from third countries and employers had to give priority in hiring to Swiss and European skilled applicants. This paper shows that the new legislation has strongly adversely affected the size of high-skill immigration from North America. Also, incentives to leave those countries have changed as North Americans are more inclined to consider home professional networks and financial opportunities. The consequence is less geographical heterogeneity in immigrants which may decrease Swiss firms' ability to gain information about non-European markets and increase their entry cost into those markets.
Subjects: 
High-skill immigration
free mobility policy
Switzerland
North America
incentives
JEL: 
F22
J21
J61
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
257.91 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.