Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/185563
Authors: 
Fosgaard, Toke Reinholt
Soetevent, Adriaan R.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Tinbergen Institute Discussion Paper TI 2018-044/VII
Abstract: 
The declining use of cash in society urges charities to experiment with digital payment instruments in their off-line fund raising activities. Cash and card payments differ in that the latter do not require individuals to donate at the time of the ask, disconnecting the decision to give from the act of giving. Evidence shows that people who say they will give mostly do not follow through. Our theory shows that having people to formally state the intended amount may alleviate this problem. We report on a field experiment the results of which show that donors who have pledged an amount are indeed more likely to follow through. The firmer the pledge, the more closely the amount donated matches the amount that was pledged. 45% of all participants however refuses to pledge. This proves that donors value flexibility over commitment in intertemporal charitable giving.
Subjects: 
Charitable fundraising
Field experiment
Image motivation
JEL: 
C93
D64
D91
H41
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
3.39 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.