Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/185557
Authors: 
Gouda, Moamen
Gutmann, Jerg
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
ILE Working Paper Series 19
Abstract: 
This study examines the effect of formal institutions, specifically constitutional provi-sions, on minority discrimination in Muslim societies. We hypothesize that those Muslim countries in which (political) Islam constitutes an important constraint in the legislative process experience more discrimination against minorities than other (Muslim) coun-tries. In other words, as Islam becomes a constitutionally prescribed source of legisla-tion in Muslim societies, it is expected that subsequent laws will be more likely in viola-tion of basic rights of minorities. In our empirical analysis, we find that where the su-premacy of Islam and Shari’a is constitutionally entrenched, religious minorities are in-deed likely to face more discrimination. Instrumental variable regressions support our interpretation that this result reflects a causal effect of constitutional rules on social out-comes. We find no evidence that Islam encourages minority discrimination if it is not constitutionalized. Our results confirm the grave dangers entailed in the institutionaliza-tion of supreme values.
Subjects: 
minority rights
discrimination
constitutions
Islam
Islamic constitutionalism
JEL: 
J15
K38
Z12
Z18
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.