Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/184465
Authors: 
Tsaurai, Kunofiwa
Year of Publication: 
2018
Citation: 
[Journal:] Comparative Economic Research [Volume:] 21 [Year:] 2018 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 51-68
Abstract: 
The study explored the impact of remittances on poverty in selected emerging markets. On the theoretical front, the optimistic view argued that remittances inflow into the labour exporting country reduces poverty whereas the pessimistic view proponents said that remittances dependence syndrome retards both economic growth and income per capita. Separately, using two measures of poverty [the poverty headcount ratio at US $1.90 and US $3.10 a day (% of population)] as dependent variables, the fixed effects approach produced results which supported the remittances led poverty reduction (optimistic) hypothesis whereas the pooled ordinary least squares (OLS) framework found that remittances inflow into the selected emerging markets led to an increase in poverty levels. The implication of the findings is that emerging markets should put in place policies that attract migrant remittances in order to reduce poverty levels. They should avoid over-reliance on remittances as that might retard economic growth and income per capita.
Subjects: 
remittances
poverty
emerging markets
panel data analysis
JEL: 
F24
I32
P2
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
Document Type: 
Article
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.