Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/182545
Authors: 
Hoffmann, Bert
Year of Publication: 
2005
Series/Report no.: 
GIGA Working Papers 2
Abstract: 
The 'Cuban safety-valve theory' explains sustained survival of Cuban socialism in part through the high levels of emigration, following Hirschman's model of 'exit' undermining 'voice'. The article argues that this remains insufficient in two important ways. Taking a closer look at the crisis years since 1989, at least as important as the opening of exit options was the Cuban state's capacity to rein in uncontrolled emigration and to reassure its 'gatekeeper role'. In addition, the transnationalization of voice and exit must be taken into account as a crucial factor, as much in feeding the regime's anti-imperialist discourse as, paradoxically, by generating sustained economic support from the emigrants.
Subjects: 
Emigration
Regime Stability
Transnational Networks
Cuba
USA
JEL: 
D31
H5
O15
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
525.83 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.