Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/182383
Authors: 
Acheson, Graeme G.
Campbell, Gareth
Gallagher, Áine
Turner, John D.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
QUCEH Working Paper Series 2018-09
Abstract: 
The early twentieth century saw an increasingly vocal movement which campaigned for women to be able to exercise their political voices independently of men. This coincided with more women participating directly in the stock market. In this paper we analyse whether these female shareholders acted independently of men. We reject the hypothesis that they were heavily influenced by male associates. Using a novel dataset of 500,000 shareholders in some of the largest British railways, we find that women were much more likely to be solo shareholders than men. There is also evidence that they prioritised their independence above other considerations such as where they invested or how diversified they could be. However, we find that they were deliberately excluded from being eligible for election to boards of directors.
Subjects: 
Gender
Investment
Stock Market
Railways
JEL: 
G10
J16
N23
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
484.41 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.