Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/181557
Authors: 
Denzer, Manuel
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Beiträge zur Jahrestagung des Vereins für Socialpolitik 2018: Digitale Wirtschaft - Session: Job Search G01-V1
Abstract: 
We examine the impact of household access to the internet on job finding rates in Germany during a period (2006_2009) in which internet access increased rapidly, and job-seekers in-creased their use of the internet as a search tool. During this period, household access to the internet was almost completely dependent on connection to a particular technology (DSL). We therefore exploit the variation in connection rates across municipalities as an instrument for household access to the internet. OLS estimates which control for differences in individual and local area characteristics suggest a job-finding advantage of about five percentage points. The IV estimates are substantially larger, but much less precisely estimated. However, we cannot reject the hypothesis that, conditional on observables, residential computer access with internt was as good as randomly assigned with respect to the job-finding rate. The hypothesis that residential computer access with internet helped job-seekers find work because of its affect on the job search process is supported by the finding that residential internet access greatly increased the use of the internet as a search method. We find some evidence that computer access reduced the use of traditional job search methods, but this effect is outweighed by the increase in internet-based search methods.
Subjects: 
Job search
unemployment
job finding rate
internet
DSL
JEL: 
J64
L86
R23
J64
C26
L86
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.