Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/181505
Authors: 
Gutmann, Jerg
Neumeier, Florian
Neuenkirch, Matthias
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
Beiträge zur Jahrestagung des Vereins für Socialpolitik 2018: Digitale Wirtschaft - Session: Development Economics I E18-V2
Abstract: 
We empirically analyze the effect of UN and US economic sanctions on life expectancy and its gender gap in target countries. Our sample covers 98 less developed and newly industrialized countries over the period 1977–2012. We employ a matching approach to account for the endogeneity of sanctions. Our results indicate that an average episode of UN sanctions reduces life expectancy by about 1.2–1.4 years. The corresponding decrease of 0.4–0.5 years under an average episode of US sanctions is significantly smaller. In addition, we find evidence that women are affected more severely by the imposition of sanctions. Sanctions not being “gender‐blind” can be interpreted as evidence that they disproportionately affect (the life expectancy of) the more vulnerable members of society. We also detect some effect heterogeneity, as the reduction in life expectancy accumulates over time. Furthermore, countries with a better political environment are less severely affected by economic sanctions.
Subjects: 
Gender Gap
Human Development
Life Expectancy
Sanctions
United Nations
United States
JEL: 
F51
F52
F53
I15
Document Type: 
Conference Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.