Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/180540
Authors: 
Aaberge, Rolf
Atkinson, Anthony B.
Königs, Sebastian
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 11522
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
Public debates about the rise in top income shares often focus on the growing dispersion in earnings and the soaring pay for top executives and financial-sector employees. But can the change in the marginal distribution of earnings on its own explain the rise in top income shares? Are top executives replacing capital owners in the group of top-income earners, or are we rather witnessing a fusion of top capital and top earnings? This paper proposes an extension of the copula framework and uses it for exploring the changing composition of top incomes. It illustrates that changes in top income shares can easily be decomposed into respective changes in the marginal distributions of labour and capital income and the changing association between the two types of income. An application using tax record data from Norway shows that the association between top labour and capital incomes grew stronger between 1995 and 2005 in the top half of the wage and capital income distribution, though it declined for the top 1 per cent of capital income receivers. A gender decomposition demonstrates that the association of wage and capital incomes at the top is particularly striking for men, while women are largely under-represented in the top halves of the two marginal distributions.
Subjects: 
income distribution
top incomes
income composition
copulas
JEL: 
C14
D31
D33
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
407.31 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.