Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/179183
Authors: 
Benndorf, Volker
Year of Publication: 
2018
Citation: 
[Journal:] Games [ISSN:] 2073-4336 [Volume:] 9 [Year:] 2018 [Issue:] 2 [Pages:] 1-17
Abstract: 
We experimentally analyze a lemons market with a labor-market framing. Sellers are referred to as 'workers' and have the possibility to provide 'employers' with costly but credible information about their 'productivity'. Economic theory suggests that in this setup, unraveling takes place and a number of different types are correctly identified in equilibrium. While we do observe a substantial degree of information disclosure, we also find that unraveling is typically not as complete as predicted by economic theory. The behavior of both workers and employers impedes unraveling in that there is too little disclosure. Workers are generally reluctant to disclose their private information, and employers enforce this behavior by bidding less competitively if workers reveal compared to the case where they conceal information.
Subjects: 
asymmetric information
information disclosure
unraveling
privacy
lemons market
JEL: 
C72
C90
C91
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.