Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/177108
Authors: 
Halliday, Timothy J.
Mazumder, Bhashkar
Wong, Ashley
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers No. 11304
Publisher: 
Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), Bonn
Abstract: 
Studies of intergenerational mobility have largely ignored health despite the central importance of health to welfare. We present the first estimates of intergenerational health mobility in the US by using repeated measures of self-reported health status (SRH) during adulthood from the PSID. Our main finding is that there is substantially greater health mobility than income mobility in the US. A possible explanation is that social institutions and policies are more effective at disrupting intergenerational health transmission than income transmission. We further show that health and income each capture a distinct dimension of social mobility. We also characterize heterogeneity in health mobility by child gender, parent gender, race, education, geography and health insurance coverage in childhood. We find some important differences in the patterns of health mobility compared with income mobility and also find some evidence that there has been a notable decline in health mobility for more recent cohorts. We use a rich set of background characteristics to highlight potential mechanisms leading to intergenerational health persistence.
Subjects: 
health
mobility
inequality
intergenerational
JEL: 
I1
I14
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
12.05 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.