Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/176951
Authors: 
Carson, Scott A.
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
CESifo Working Paper 6932
Abstract: 
The body mass index (BMI) reflects current net nutrition and health during economic development. This study introduces a difference-in-decompositions approach to show that although 19th century African-American current net nutrition was comparable to working class whites, it was made worse-off with the transition to free-labor. BMI reflects net nutrition over the life-course, and like stature, slave children’s BMIs increased more than whites as they approached entry into the adult slave labor force. Agricultural worker’s net nutrition was better than workers in other occupations but was worse-off under free-labor and industrialization. Within-group BMI variation was greater than across-group variation, and white within-group variation associated with socioeconomic status was greater than African-Americans.
Subjects: 
BMI variation
current net nutrition
Oaxaca decomposition
JEL: 
C10
C40
D10
I10
N30
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.