Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/176685
Authors: 
Liwiński, Jacek
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
GLO Discussion Paper 193
Abstract: 
In 1966 the minimum school-leaving age was increased from 14 to 15 years in Poland. This was a result of extending the primary school education from 7 to 8 years. At the same time, the reform did not affect the education system at post-primary levels, that is the system of secondary and higher education. In result, all education tracks were extended by one year. Using the regression discontinuity design and data from the Polish LFS (2001-2005), we find that the reform had no impact on men's and women's hourly earnings and employment rate. A similar finding was reported earlier for a few Western European countries. However, our study is the first one to estimate the impact of the compulsory schooling extended in a centrally planned economy on the individuals' labour market outcomes in the period of economic transition. Besides, we find that the reform had a negative impact on the hourly earnings of individuals with primary education.
Subjects: 
education
schooling
earnings
regression discontinuity design
JEL: 
I21
I26
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.