Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/176324
Authors: 
Tewar, Meenu
Aziz, Zeba
Cook, Mitchell
Goldar, Amrita
Ray, Indro
Ray, Saon
Roy Chowdhury, Sahana
Unnikrishnan, Vidhya
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper 306
Abstract: 
India is at the cusp of a major urban transition. In less than twenty years, India's urban population is expected to nearly double from 377 million today to over 600 million. Indian cities already contribute an estimated two-thirds of India's GDP, and this number is expected to rise to 75% by 2031. With 70% of all new jobs expected to come from urban areas, accommodating a growing urban workforce will require large investments in new urban spaces. How prepared is India to deal with this rapid, inevitable urban expansion? The evidence on the ground suggests that the costs of India's current pattern of urbanization are unsustainably high. Deep existing deficits in basic urban services such as housing, transit, water, sanitation and energy have led to a plethora of urban woes. These range from the economic, institutional and carbon costs of managing unplanned growth, congestion, poor quality of life, burgeoning slums and pollution levels that have come to threaten basic public health. [...]
Subjects: 
economic growth
urbanization
urban growth
spatial development
land use patterns
carbon emissions
urban infrastructure
mitigation options
adaptation
sustainable and inclusive growth
accessibility
urban resilience
municipal finance
JEL: 
R1
R11
R12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.