Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/175268
Authors: 
Schünemann, Johannes
Strulik, Holger
Trimborn, Timo
Year of Publication: 
2018
Series/Report no.: 
cege Discussion Papers No. 339
Abstract: 
Married people live longer than singles but how much of the longevity gap is causal and what the particular mechanisms are is not fully understood. In this paper we propose a new approach, based on counterfactual computational experiments, in order to asses how much of the marriage gap can be explained by income pooling and public-goods sharing as well as collective bargaining of partners with different preferences and biology. For that purpose we integrate cooperative decision making of a couple into a biologically founded life-cycle model of health deficit accumulation and endogenous longevity. We calibrate the model with U.S. data and perform the counterfactual experiment of preventing the partnership. We elaborate four economic channels and find that, as singles, men live 8.5 months shorter and women 6 months longer. We conclude that about 25% of the marriage gain in longevity of men can be motivated by economic calculus while the marriage gain for women observed in the data is attributed to selection or other (non-standard economic) motives.
Subjects: 
health
aging
longevity
marriage-gap
gender-specific preferences
unhealthy behavior
JEL: 
D91
J17
J26
I12
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
513.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.