Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/174454
Authors: 
Chiquiar, Daniel
Covarrubias, Enrique
Salcedo, Alejandrina
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers No. 2017-01
Abstract: 
We analyze the labor market consequences of international trade, using the evidence provided by the behavior of Mexican labor markets after the introduction of NAFTA in the nineties and the accession of China to the WTO in 2001. Following an approach close to that proposed by Autor, Dorn and Hanson (2013), we use the local market variation on exposure to international markets to identify the effects of these events. We show that NAFTA integration reduced unemployment, and boosted employment and wages. Chinese competition tended to have the opposite effect. Additionally, we find that the labor market responses to international trade are heterogeneous across regions in the country, being significantly stronger in the regions closer to the U.S. border.
Subjects: 
International trade and labor markets
local labor markets
Mexico
NAFTA
Chinese competition
JEL: 
E24
F14
F16
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Appears in Collections:

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.61 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.