Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/173847
Authors: 
Acerenza, Santiago
Gandelman, Néstor
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IDB Working Paper Series IDB-WP-773
Abstract: 
This paper characterizes household spending in education using microdata from income and expenditure surveys for 12 Latin American and Caribbean countries and the United States. Bahamas, Chile and Mexico have the highest household spending in education while Bolivia, Brazil and Paraguay have the lowest. Tertiary education is the most important form of spending, and most educational spending is performed for individuals 18-23 years old. More educated and richer household heads spend more in the education of household members. Households with both parents present and those with a female main income provider spend more than their counterparts. Urban households also spend more than rural households. On average, education in Latin America and the Caribbean is a luxury good, while it may be a necessity in the United States. No gender bias is found in primary education, but households invest more in females of secondary age and up than same-age males.
Subjects: 
Education
Income and expenditure surveys
Engel equations
Latin America
JEL: 
E21
I2
D12
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/legalcode
Document Type: 
Working Paper
Social Media Mentions:

7



Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.