Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/172309
Authors: 
Boianovsky, Mauro
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
CHOPE Working Paper 2017-17
Abstract: 
The role of traveling as a source of discovery and development of new ideas has been controversial in the history of economics. Despite their protective attitude toward established theory, economists have traveled widely and gained new insights or asked new questions as a result of their exposition to "other" economic systems, ideas and forms of behavior. That is particularly the case when they travel to new places while their frameworks are in their initial stages or undergoing changes. This essay examines economists' traveling as a potential source of new hypotheses, from the 18th to the 20th centuries, with a detailed case study of Douglass North's 1961 travel to Brazil.
Subjects: 
Travel
economic theories
Douglass North
Brazil
otherness
JEL: 
B00
B30
B41
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
495.03 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.