Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/172019
Authors: 
Gericke, Erika Edith
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] International Journal for Research in Vocational Education and Training (IJRVET) [ISSN:] 2197-8646 [Volume:] 4 [Year:] 2017 [Issue:] 3 [Pages:] 206-225
Abstract: 
Educational choices, especially the influence of class on these choices have been a subject of lively international debate. However, thus far, there has been little international and comparative research with respect to vocational and education training (VET) decision making from a subject-oriented perspective. This paper considers occupational-biographical orientations of English and German car mechatronics and focuses on the roles of learning and gaining vocational qualifications. Drawing on the concept of occupational-biographical orientations, the paper describes three types of orientations based on analyses of findings from 11 autobiographical-narrative interviews with English and German car mechatronics. The interviews clearly showed that occupational-biographical orientations explained different views on the necessity of returning to (continuous) vocational education and training. They also demonstrated that subjective perceptions of the national VET system fostered particular occupational-biographical challenges, which supported or hindered existing learning attitudes. Overall, the findings suggested that occupational-biographical orientations exerted the most important influence on learning biographies and decisions to return to (continuous) VET.
Subjects: 
VET
Vocational Education and Training
Comparative Qualitative Research
Lifelong Learning
Return on Education and Training
England
Germany
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
373.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.