Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/171754
Authors: 
Jackson, Osborne
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
Working Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston 15-18
Abstract: 
This paper investigates the impact of immigration on the college enrollment of U.S. natives. Many studies have focused on the effect of increased demand for schooling by immigrants on the enrollment of natives. However, changes in immigrant labor supply may also affect native enrollment by changing local market prices. Using U.S. Census data from 1970 to 2000, I find that state-level increases in the number of immigrant college students do not significantly lower the enrollment rates of U.S. natives. On the contrary, state-level increases in the ratio of unskilled immigrant workers to skilled immigrant workers significantly raise native enrollment rates. These findings suggest that the demand for college is sensitive to wage rates and that college slots are flexibly supplied over a decadal time horizon.
Subjects: 
immigration
native college enrollment
labor market
crowd out
JEL: 
J24
J61
J22
J23
H75
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.