Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170802
Authors: 
Galor, Oded
Klemp, Marc
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10818
Abstract: 
Exploiting a novel geo-referenced data set of population diversity across ethnic groups, this research advances the hypothesis and empirically establishes that variation in population diversity across human societies, as determined in the course of the exodus of humans from Africa tens of thousands of years ago, contributed to the differential formation of pre-colonial autocratic institutions within ethnic groups and the emergence of autocratic institutions across countries. Diversity has amplified the importance of institutions in mitigating the adverse effects of non-cohesiveness on productivity, while contributing to the scope for domination, leading to the formation of institutions of the autocratic type.
Subjects: 
institutions
diversity
economic growth
autocracy
Out-of-Africa Hypothesis of Comparative Development
JEL: 
O1
O43
Z10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
1.87 MB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.