Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170757
Authors: 
Maczulskij, Terhi
Böckerman, Petri
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 10773
Abstract: 
This paper examines the effects of past stressful life events on subsequent labor market success using data on twins matched to comprehensive register-based, individual-level information on income and employment status. The long-term labor market outcomes are measured during 20-year follow-up. We use the within-twin method to account for unobservable family and genetic confounders. The twin design reveals three important findings. First, stressors lead to worse labor market outcomes. Second, men are more affected by financial and job-related stressors, while women are more affected by family stressors. Third, the negative effects that stressors have on labor market outcomes diminish as time passes.
Subjects: 
stressors
stressful life events
employment
earnings
co-twin control
twins
JEL: 
I31
J24
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
970.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.