Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170726
Authors: 
Hielscher, Stefan
Pies, Ingo
Valentinov, Vladislav
Chatalova, Lioudmila
Year of Publication: 
2016
Citation: 
[Journal:] International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [ISSN:] 1660-4601 [Volume:] 13 [Issue:] 5 (Article No.:) 476 [Pages:] 1-10
Abstract: 
The public discourse on the acceptability of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is not only controversial, but also infused with highly emotional and moralizing rhetoric. Although the assessment of risks and benefits of GMOs must be a scientific exercise, many debates on this issue seem to remain impervious to scientific evidence. In many cases, the moral psychology attributes of the general public create incentives for both GMO opponents and proponents to pursue misleading public campaigns, which impede the comprehensive assessment of the full spectrum of the risks and benefits of GMOs. The ordonomic approach to economic ethics introduced in this research note is helpful for disentangling the socio-economic and moral components of the GMO debate by re- and deconstructing moral claims.
Subjects: 
agricultural myths
discourse
ethics
GMO
morality
ordonomics
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
URL of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article
Document Version: 
Published Version

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.