Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/170704
Authors: 
Fu, Tong
Year of Publication: 
2017
Citation: 
[Journal:] Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal [Year:] 2017 [Volume:] 11 [Issue:] 2017-31 [Pages:] 1-27
Abstract: 
The existing literature suggests that economic institutions determine the allocation of resources for economic growth. As an important counterexample, although China has one of the world's fastest-growing economies, its legal and financial systems are underdeveloped. With evidence from China, the author confirms that government intervention positively and causally determines firms' access to credit. The author further provides evidence that government intervention enables firms' profit through facilitating access to credit. This evidence confirms that the mechanism of government intervention allows firms' access to credit and then enables the firms to obtain relatively large profits. Ultimately, this paper reveals that, in the absence of effective economic institutions, government intervention determines firms' access to credit.
Subjects: 
access to credit
government intervention
mediation effect
JEL: 
O17
G21
G28
C51
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size
498.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.