Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/168393
Authors: 
Dahlberg, Matz
Mani, Kevin
Öhman, Mattias
Wanhainen, Anders
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Department of Economics, Uppsala University 2016:2
Abstract: 
We examine how health information affects individuals' subjective well-being using a regression discontinuity design on data from a screening program for an asymptomatic disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The information provided to the individuals is guided by the measured aorta size and its relation to pre-determined levels. When comparing individuals that receive information that they are healthy with those that receive information that they are in the risk zone for AAA, we find no effects. However, when comparing those that receive information that they have a small AAA, and will be under increased surveillance, with those who receive information that they are in the risk zone, we find a weak positive effect on wellbeing. This indicates that the information about increased surveillance (positive) may outweigh the information about worse health (negative).
Subjects: 
Information
Health
Screening
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
JEL: 
D80
I12
I31
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.