Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/166030
Authors: 
Lorenz, Olga
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
IAAEU Discussion Paper Series in Economics 07/2017
Abstract: 
How and why commuting contributes to our well-being is of considerable importance for transportation policy and planning. This paper analyses the relation between commuting and subjective well-being by considering several cognitive (e.g., satisfaction with family life, leisure, income, work, health) and affective (e.g., happiness, anger, worry, sadness) components of subjective well-being. Fixed-effects models are estimated with German Socio-Economic Panel data for the period 2007 - 2013. In contrast to previous papers in the literature, according to which commuting is bad for overall life satisfaction, we find no evidence that commuting in general is associated with a lower life satisfaction. Rather, it appears that longer commutes are only related to lower satisfaction with particular life domains, especially family life and leisure time. Time spent on housework, child care as well as physical and leisure activities mediate the association between commuting and well-being.
Subjects: 
commuting distance
emotion
satisfaction
time use
well-being
JEL: 
I10
I31
R40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.