Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163547
Authors: 
Bhalotra, Sonia
Diaz-Cayeros, Alberto
Miller, Grant
Miranda, Alfonso
Venkataramani, Atheendar S.
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
ISER Working Paper Series 2017-04
Abstract: 
Historically, improvements municipal drinking water quality contributed significantly to mortality decline in wealthy countries. However, water disinfection has not produced equivalent benefits in developing countries today. We investigate this puzzle by analyzing a large-scale municipal water disinfection program in Mexico in 1991 that dramatically increased access to chlorinated water. On average, we find that the program led to a 37 to 48% decline in diarrheal mortality among children and was highly cost-effective ($1,310 per life-year saved). However, age (degradation) of water pipes and insufficient complementary sanitation infrastructure attenuated these benefits. Countervailing behavioral responses, although present, appear to be less important.
Subjects: 
clean water
chlorination
child mortality
infectious disease
diarrhea
Mexico
cost-effectiveness
sanitation
behavioral responses
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.