Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163526
Authors: 
Bryan, Mark
Nandi, Alita
Year of Publication: 
2015
Series/Report no.: 
ISER Working Paper Series 2015-21
Abstract: 
Following theories of social and economic identity, we use representative data containing measures of personal identity to investigate the interplay of work identity and hours of work in determining subjective wellbeing (job satisfaction, job-related anxiety and depression, and life satisfaction). We find that for a given level of hours, having a stronger work identity is associated with higher wellbeing on most measures. Working long hours is associated with lower wellbeing and working part-time is associated with higher wellbeing, but for men hours mainly affect their job-related anxiety and depression rather than reported satisfaction. The relationships between hours and wellbeing are generally strengthened when controlling for identity implying that individuals sort into jobs with work hours that match their identities. Work identity partially mitigates the adverse effects of long hours working on job satisfaction and anxiety (for women) and on life satisfaction (for men). The effects of both work hours and identity are substantial relative to benchmark effects of health on wellbeing.
Subjects: 
identity
wellbeing
working hours
job satisfaction
anxiety
depression
JEL: 
J22
J28
J29
I31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
928.09 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.