Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163105
Authors: 
Smoke, Paul J.
Year of Publication: 
2016
Series/Report no.: 
ADBI Working Paper Series 606
Abstract: 
Fiscal decentralization and intergovernmental fiscal relations reform have become nearly ubiquitous in developing countries. Performance, however, has often been disappointing in terms of both policy formulation and outcomes. The dynamics underlying these results have been poorly researched. Available literature focuses heavily on policy and institutional design concerns framed by public finance, fiscal federalism, and public management principles. The literature tends to explain unsatisfactory outcomes largely as a result of some combination of flawed design and management of intergovernmental fiscal systems, insufficient capacity, and lack of political will. These factors are important, but there is room to broaden the analysis in at least two potentially valuable ways. First, much can be learned by more robustly examining how national and local political and bureaucratic forces shape the policy space, providing opportunities for and placing constraints on effective and sustainable reform. Second, the analysis would benefit from moving beyond design to considering how to implement reform more strategically.
Subjects: 
fiscal decentralization
intergovernmental relations
political economy
strategic implementation
Asia
JEL: 
H70
H71
H72
H73
H77
Creative Commons License: 
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
455.51 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.