Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163041
Authors: 
Howard, Emma
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2017/69
Abstract: 
This paper uses panel data to assess the relative importance of social networks and geographic proximity to micro, small, and medium enterprises in Viet Nam. The results suggest that a larger social network, and hiring employees mainly through social networks, are both correlated with higher value added per worker. The number of government officials and civil servants in a firm's network emerges as particularly important. When the quality of contacts is controlled for, firms with tighter social networks have, on average, higher value added per worker. The analysis of spatial networks reveals that firms with a lower percentage of customers and suppliers in the same district actually have higher value added per worker. The results suggest that for micro, small, and medium firms in Viet Nam, strong social networks are much more important than geographic proximity.
Subjects: 
social networks
geographic proximity
manufacturing firms
Viet Nam
JEL: 
L14
L20
D22
ISBN: 
978-92-9256-293-9
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
578.56 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.