Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/163036
Authors: 
Agarwala, Rina
Year of Publication: 
2017
Series/Report no.: 
WIDER Working Paper 2017/57
Abstract: 
This paper brings labour back into the literature on legal empowerment against poverty. Employing a historical lens, I outline three waves of legal movements. Each wave is distinguished by its timing, the state-level target, and the actors involved. In all three waves, legal empowerment was won, not bestowed. Labour played a significant role, fighting in each subsequent wave for an expanded identity to address exclusions. These findings reveal the false dichotomy used to distinguish workers from citizens and class from identity-based interests. They underline the significance of symbolic power of legal recognition, even in the absence of perfect implementation. Finally, they highlight contemporary workers as an overlooked, identity-based group that addresses the intersectionalities between class and ascriptive characteristics.
Subjects: 
labour
judicial activism
legal empowerment
informal workers
social movements
India
ISBN: 
978-92-9256-281-6
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
441.85 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.